Death of Newspapers Accelerating

Newspapers are Dead

According to TechCrunch, one of my preferred online news sources, in a piece by Duncan Riley:

“Figures released by the Newspaper Association of America show that the decline of newspapers is more rapid than previously thought, with total print advertising revenue in 2007 plunging 9.4% to $42 billion compared to 2006, the biggest drop in revenue since 1950, the year they started tracking annual revenue.”

We are witnessing a major upheaval in the media landscape, as the Internet makes the print news model increasingly untenable. Printed news is expensive to produce, arrives so slowly that it can hardly be called “news” upon arrival, and is an absurd waste of trees and energy.

What does that mean? The race is on to figure out the winning model for online news. Somewhat ironically, the New York Times wades in on the topic, with a piece by Saul Hansel, entitled “PaidContent vs. TechCrunch: Two Visions of Blogging’s Future.” It might have been better titled, “Two Visions of the Future of the New York Times.”

My previous post here.

And the original source here.

3 thoughts on “Death of Newspapers Accelerating

  1. […] to do. As the world of “old media” (a.k.a. print newspapers and magazines) is in a death spiral, the “buzz” is increasingly determined by the community of the blogosphere and the […]

  2. […] I also admire the creativity and ambition implied by Michael Arrington’s piece, and sincerely hope that his post is true. Indeed, it is time for the Wall Street Journal (and all other newspapers) to address, head-on, the existential threat that the Internet represents to the entire industry of news delivery. As loyal readers will recall, I’ve been on record that the death of newspapers is accelerating. […]

  3. […] that such a virtuous cycle will play an essential role in enabling the newspaper industry to evolve from its print past to its online future, with a viable long-term business model that is native to the Social […]

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